2006-10-12

[Ellington Shul] Correction!

I messed that up a little bit, blame it on rushing before work! 
 
Candlelighting for Ellington Tomorrow is 5:55pm
Candlelighting for Simchas Torah on Saturday is at 6:53pm.
Havdalah for Yom Tov is at 6:52pm on Sunday.
 
No services at shul, this if for you at home.
 
Chag Sameach!

--
Elias Friedman A.S., EMT-P
Co-President Congregation Knesseth Israel
http://www.ellingtonshul.org/

elipongo@gmail.com
http://elipongo.blogspot.com/


--
Elias Friedman A.S., EMT-P
Co-President Congregation Knesseth Israel
http://www.ellingtonshul.org/

elipongo@gmail.com
http://elipongo.blogspot.com/
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[Ellington Shul] Almost forgot!

Oh yeah!
 
Candlelighting for Ellington Tomorrow is 5:55pm
Havdalah on Saturday is at 6:53pm
 
No services at shul, this if for you at home.
 
Chag Sameach!

--
Elias Friedman A.S., EMT-P
Co-President Congregation Knesseth Israel
http://www.ellingtonshul.org/

elipongo@gmail.com
http://elipongo.blogspot.com/

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Congregation Knesseth Israel's Website is http://www.ellingtonshul.org/
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[Ellington Shul] No Services this week. Two Celebrations of the Torah

Chag Sameach everyone!
 
We do NOT have any shabbos services this week. We are holding Shabbos services on the first and the third Shabboses of each civil month.
 
Our next set of Shabbos services will be on Friday, October 20th and Saturday October 21st. Rabbi Yossi Wolff is coming up with his wife, Mindy, and their two lovely daughters to spend Shabbos with us. Mindy's bringing up some more of her spectacular food for the Kiddushes we're planning.
 
And, as an extra goody, we're going to be screening the award winning Israel film, Ushpizin, after Shabbos on Saturday night!
 
I hope all of you can make it to this weekend of events, and invite some guests too!
 
In other news, we will likely be having a general membership meeting sometime in November, I'll get back to you all soon with more on that.
 
I've appended an article from Aish.com about Simchas Torah. Even though we won't be dancing with our own Torah scrolls this year, it's good to understand why it is we're supposed to be celebrating.
 
Kol Tov, everyone!
 

--
Elias Friedman A.S., EMT-P
Co-President Congregation Knesseth Israel
http://www.ellingtonshul.org/

elipongo@gmail.com
http://elipongo.blogspot.com/
 
 
Welcome   See this article online:
http://www.aish.com/sukkotshmini/sukkotshminidefault/Two_Celebrations_of_the_Torah.asp
Two Why do we have two holidays for the Torah -- Shavuot and Simchat Torah?

If the holiday of Shavuot celebrates the receiving of the Torah, why was Simchat Torah -- immediately following Sukkot -- chosen as the day to end and begin the annual Torah reading cycle?

Furthermore, why do we have two holidays for the Torah -- Shavuot and Simchat Torah? They are also celebrated so differently. On Shavuot, we stay up all night learning Torah. And on Simchat Torah, we dance.

The need for these two holidays has been explained in a parable that has been handed down from generation to generation.

Once a king issued a proclamation. Any one of his subjects was welcome to try for the hand of his daughter. On one condition: The potential suitor was not allowed to meet or see his daughter before the marriage.

The proclamation caused quite a stir. Soon the local inns were buzzing with speculation and rumors. "I hear she is a real shrew," said one. "I heard she is a deaf-mute," said another. "I know for a fact that she is a total imbecile," intoned a third. Round and round the rumors flew. Finally, a simple wholehearted Jew spoke up. "I am willing to marry her. How bad can she be? After all, she is the king's daughter and we all know how great our king is."

Word quickly spread and the suitor was led to the palace. As it turned out, he was the only one who volunteered. The king accepted the match and the wedding date was set.

After the lavish wedding, the groom escorted his bride to their new home. She removed her heavy veil, and he was astounded at her beauty. Remembering the rumors of her reputed faults, the groom decided to thoroughly test her. He engaged her in conversation, tested her in character and refinement and found himself pleasantly surprised. In every way, she excelled beyond his greatest hopes and dreams. Overjoyed, he held a lavish party to celebrate his good fortune.

PARABLE EXPLAINED

The King in the parable is God. When He wanted to give the Torah, He offered it to each nation in turn. All the nations refused, each one claiming some fault in the Torah they would not be able to live with. When God offered it to the Jews, they said 'Naaseh VeNishma' -- "we will do, and then we will understand" (Exodus 24:7). The Jewish people accepted the Torah without having seen it, as they were grateful for all God had done for them.

Though the Jewish people fully accepted the Torah, they feared a loss. They assumed that the numerous obligations in the Torah would deprive them of their pleasures and freedom. Similarly, the groom in the parable married the king's daughter fearing he would be disappointed in other areas. But as the Jews learned the Torah and applied it's teaching to their lives, they were pleasantly surprised. Not only did they not have to give up anything, they found the Torah maximized their pleasure in every way.

Therefore at the conclusion of reading the Torah, when we have again delved into its teachings for a full year, we make a party on Simchat Torah.

On Shavuot, we stay up and learn all night to show our readiness and anticipation to receive the Torah. Because it is an intellectual appreciation, we stay up all night learning Torah. On Simchat Torah, however, we dance -- expressing the emotional joy of the body. We are showing that even our bodies have gained tremendously by keeping the Torah.

Ask anyone who has increased their Torah observance and they will tell you the same. At first, each feared, according to his or her nature, that some aspect of the Torah would be restrictive. Be it keeping Shabbat, kosher, family purity or laws of proper speech, each encountered an area that tested their resolve. However, they kept the Torah knowing it was the most meaningful thing to do. And as they grew in their Judaism, they found their lives enhanced in every way.

It is with this renewed appreciation that we approach Simchat Torah. We are filled with gratitude and awe for the great gift that God has bestowed on us with love.

((based on Otzar haShavous quoting Rav Avraham and the Dubno Magid)

This article can also be read at: http://www.aish.com/sukkotshmini/sukkotshminidefault/Two_Celebrations_of_the_Torah.asp





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You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Ellington Shul" group.
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My sukkah

Well, this is my humble one man Sukkah that I built for myself.

Actually, since I had no time off between Yom Kippur and Sukkos, I didn't end up building it before the holiday.

During the weekend, I ate over at my sister, Irene's, sukkah. She told me I was being silly for not simply buying a kit and insisting on building one myself.

I didn't have a meal from Sunday morning until Tuesday evening when I finally had a chance to erect my own sukkah.

I used... well I can't really call them plans per se, lets call it a description on how to build a sukkah from this site.

Yeah, it came out a little bit sloppy, but I had very little sleep and was a teensy bit hungry by the time of construction!

Its very sturdy even built in the way I did. I've already got it figured out how to do it better for next year!

Then I found this site which has pictures of sukkahs from around the world. I sent them my picture to add to the list. Pretty fun!

Chag Sameach!

2006-10-09

Pretty morning!

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